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A Lock on Safety

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Groom School Compares Favorably to Larger Campus Enrollments; But, Safety Still Takes Investment, Focus

A locked security door and a doorbell separate any school visitors from being able to come straight in to interact with students. Students seem unfazed by the extra doors, unless they are locked out before 7:15 a.m. on a cold morning.

Kodi Tiffin

A locked security door and a doorbell separate any school visitors from being able to come straight in to interact with students. Students seem unfazed by the extra doors, unless they are locked out before 7:15 a.m. on a cold morning. "I think they're fine," seventh-grader Saffron Eugea said. "They do make me feel safer."

As time marches on, society changes. It doesn’t matter if the focus is life in metropolitan areas or the boondocks, Father Time – and the modifications he carries – will catch up – even in tradition-filled Groom School.

Security doors
When visitors enter the front doors, some recent modifications grab their attention. Only two years ago when a parent or friend came to school, they could walk straight into the building without having to interact with anyone Now, with the increased number of nationally publicized shootings, Groom administration decided it was in the best interest of the 146 students that attend here to increase security.

“We put in the doors because we want to restrict the outside,” superintendent Jay Lamb said.

The doors cost the district just under $30,000, but according to Lamb, that was a small price to pay for safety.

“We just want to control who gets to the kids,” the superintendent said.

Students seem unfazed by the extra doors, unless they are locked out before 7:15 a.m. on a cold morning.

“I think they’re fine,” seventh-grader Saffron Eugea said. “They do make me feel safer.”

The person with the power to open the front main door is school secretary Frances Payton. When visitors come, she must grant them permission and open the door for guests after they notify her of their arrival by ringing a door bell. This new admission system comes at a cost of more than dollars, too.

“This one by me, which I am responsible for, has become a tremendous burden,” Payton said. “It makes it difficult to complete my work in a timely manner.”

Yet, she realizes that some inconveniences may be worth the trouble.

“I understand the purpose and intent of the doors,” she said.

GroomTigerTimes.com reporters will be covering other changes that time has brought in future articles, including hallway cameras and drug testing.

 

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A Lock on Safety